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Open call for 'Spin Your Thesis!' 2015

on 02 September 2014

Update 23.02.2015: The HyperMed team, composed of three Romanian students, is one of the four teams selected to develop and conduct their experiments under hypergravity conditions during the sixth ‘Spin Your Thesis!’ campaign. Further details are available here.

The Romanian Space Agency (ROSA) invites teams of Romanian university students to submit proposals for the next “Spin Your Thesis!” campaign which will take place in the autumn of 2015 and will offer them the opportunity to conduct hypergravity experiments.

The sixth SYT campaign, which will take place September-October 2015, is open to four teams of undergraduate, graduate and PhD students from ESA Member or Cooperating States.

The selected teams, each comprising up to four students, will be given the rare opportunity to conduct science or technology experiments under hypergravity conditions (between 1 and 20 times Earth’s gravity). These experiments must be linked to part of their academic syllabus.

SYT enables students to use ESA’s Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC) facility, which is located at ESA’s European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The facility is available for up to 2.5 days per team (with flexible time slots).

A review board composed of experts from ESA and ELGRA (European Low Gravity Research Association) will select the best experiment proposals to be performed in the LDC. ESA staff will provide technical support to the selected teams throughout the experiment design and completion. In addition, ELGRA will offer students the opportunity to consult a scientific mentor.
The ESA Education Office will provide financial support to cover part of travel, accommodation and/or hardware expenses.
The submission deadline for experiment proposals for SYT 2015 is 7 December 2014.

For further details please visit the ESA website.

Instructions on how to apply are available here.

Image credit: ESA